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Posts Tagged ‘Hyper-V

Failover Clustering & Hyper-V: Planning your Highly-Available

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From Microsoft tech.ed online here’s an excellent video to help you with the Failover Clustering in Hyper-V.

This technical session will discuss Hyper-V and Failover Clustering live migration, deployment considerations, licensing, upgrades, host clustering, guest clustering, disaster recovery, multi-site clustering, System Center Virtual Machine Manager, hardware and validation. What are the pros and cons of each virtualization solution? What’s right for my customers and their scenarios? What about combining physical and virtual machines in the same cluster? This session will include a live demo of a Hyper-V Cluster deployment and live migration.

🙂

 
 

Written by IT Core

November 23, 2010 at 9:34 PM

Posted in How to..., Videos, Virtualization

Tagged with ,

How Time Synchronization works in Hyper-V

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Ben Armstrong explains in dep How Time Synchronization works in Hyper-V.

Problem #1 – Running virtual machines lose track of time.

While all computers contain a hardware clock (called the RTC – or real-time clock) most operating systems do not rely on this clock.  Instead they read the time from this clock once (when they boot) and then they use their own internal routines to calculate how much time has passed.

The problem is that these internal routines make assumptions about how the underlying hardware behaves (how frequently interrupts are delivered, etc…) and these assumptions do not account for the fact that things are different inside a virtual machine.  The fact that multiple virtual machines need to be scheduled to run on the same physical hardware invariably results in minor differences in these underlying systems.  The net result of this is that time appears to drift inside of virtual machines.

UPDATE 11/22: One thing that you should be aware of here: the rate at which the time in a virtual machine drifts is affected by the total system load of the Hyper-V server.  More virtual machines doing more stuff means time drifts faster.

In order to deal with time drift in a virtual machine – you need to have some process that regularly gets the real time from a trusted source and updates the time in a virtual machine.

Hyper-V provides the time synchronization integration services to do this for you.  The way it does this is by getting time readings from the management operating system and sending them over to the guest operating system.  Once inside the guest operating system – these time readings are then delivered to the Windows time keeping infrastructure in the form of an Windows time provider (you can read more about this here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb608215.aspx).   These time samples are correctly adjusted for any time zone difference between the management operating system and the guest operating system.

Problem #2 – Saved virtual machines / snapshots have the wrong time when they are restored.

When we restore a virtual machines from a saved state or from a snapshot we put back together the memory and run state of the guest operating system to exactly match what it was when the saved state / snapshot was taken.  This includes the time calculated by the guest operating system.  So if the snapshot was taken one month ago – the time and date will report that it is still one month ago.

Interestingly enough, at this point in time we will be reporting the correct (with some caveats) time in the systems RTC.  But unfortunately the guest operating system has no idea that anything significant has happened – so it does not know to go and check the RTC and instead continues with its own internally calculated time.

To deal with this the Hyper-V time synchronization integration service detects whenever it has come back from a saved state or snapshot, and corrects the time.  It does this by issuing a time change request through the normal user mode interfaces provided by Windows.  The effect of this is that it looks just like the user sat down and changed the time manually.  This method also correctly adjusts for time zone differences between the management operating system and the guest operating system.

Read more here 🙂

Written by IT Core

November 23, 2010 at 9:25 PM

Posted in Documentation, Tools, Virtualization

Tagged with

SCVMM P2V fails with Error 2910 (0x80070005) Access Denied

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Symptom

When using Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 to perform a Physical-to-Virtual conversion (P2V), the following error message appears during the Scan System phase.
Error (2910)
VMM does not have appropriate permissions to access the resource on the %server.
Access is denied (0x80070005)
Recommended Action
Ensure that Virtual Machine Manager has the appropriate rights to perform this action.
Additional Information: The Source computer is the machine intended to be virtualized in the P2V conversion.

 Cause

This failure is typically caused by either of the following conditions:

•  The credentials provided during the P2V wizard is not a member of the local ‘Administrators’ group on the Source computer.
•  The Source computer does not allow remote WMI calls to the CIMV2 namespace for the credentials entered during the P2V wizard.

Resolution
To resolve the problem, follow these steps:

  1. Make sure that the account used during the P2V wizard is a member of the local ‘Administrators’ group on the Source computer. Note Pay particular attention to this if the SCVMM server and Source computer are in different domains.
  2. During the Scan System phase of the P2V conversion, SCVMM makes WMI calls to the CIMV2 namespace on the Source computer to pull basic system information. If these WMI calls fail, then the P2V conversion will also fail. To verify WMI connectivity to the CIMV2 namespace on the Source computer, perform the following actions from the SCVMM server:
  3. Click Start , point to Run and type ” WBEMtest” (without the quotes) in the Open box and click OK . This will open the WBEMtest window.
  4. Click Connect in the upper right hand corner.
  5. Now, connect to the CIMV2 namespace on the Source computer.

Example: \\Source\ROOT\CIMV2

                Note Be sure to use the name of your Source computer.

  1. Then click Connect to complete the connection. This should connect without any errors displayed.
  2. Just to confirm access to a sample object, select Open Class and type Win32_PhysicalMemory
  3. You should see objects populate in the Object Editor window. The actual content returned is not as important as the fact that a remote connection to the CIMV2 namespace was established.
  4. Open wmimgmt.msc and verify connectivity to the Local computer and also check the ‘Remote Enable’ permissions.
    1. Click Start , point to Run and type wmimgmt.msc and click OK . This will open the WMI Control (Local).
    2. Right click on the WMI Control (Local) node and select Properties .
    3. Select the Security tab, highlight Root and then open security by clicking the Security button in the lower right.
    4. Select “Remote Enable” permission for Everyone or the specific user account that you want to grant this permission to.
    5. This action does not require a reboot.
    6. Open dcomcnfg and verify that DCOM is running and also check the ‘Remote Activation’ permission.
      1. Click Start , point to Run and type dcomcnfg and click OK . This will open the Component Services snap-in.|
      2. Expand Component Service , then Computers , then My Computer . If My Computer has a red down arrow mark, it means that the service is not running. It will need to be started.
      3. Right click on My Computer and select Properties and select the COM Security tab.
      4. Click Edit Limits under the Launch and Activation Permissions section.
      5. For the Everyone user give the “Remote Activation” permission or add the specific user account that you want to grant this permission to.

Note The following error message may occur if the appropriate WMI permission is not granted to the user:
Access Denied” with Error Code: 0x80041003

  1. This problem can also occur if the OLE registry key is missing or has the incorrect value on the Source computer.
    1. Start Registry Editor.
    2. Locate the following path:
      HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\OLE
    3. This key should have a REG_SZ value EnableDCOM and a value of Y

Written by IT Core

November 23, 2010 at 9:17 PM

KB2465160: Add Host or other action fails with (2916) 0x80338126 in System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008

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From Microsoft , KB2465160.

Symptoms
Adding a Host to System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 (SCVMM 2008) fails with a variation of Error (2916):

Error (2916)
VMM is unable to complete the request. The connection to the agent ServerA.contoso.com was lost.
(The WinRM client cannot complete the operation within the time specified. Check if the machine name is valid and is reachable over the network and firewall exception for Windows Remote Management service is enabled. (0x80338126))

Recommended Action:
Ensure that the WS-Management service and the agent are installed and running and that a firewall is not blocking HTTP traffic. If the error persists; reboot ServerA.contoso.com and then try the operation again.

Cause
Specific content is being filtered by a non-Windows firewall. The firewall could be software installed on either the SCVMM 2008 Server or the Host that is being added. More likely, there is a hardware appliance firewall on the network between the two communicating servers.

Resolution
Test multiple communication protocols between the two systems; the SCVMM 2008 Server and Host in this example. Some firewalls can have content filtering enabled despite showing that it is not. Remove all non-Windows software firewalls and bypass all hardware appliance firewalls entirely long enough to perform testing to verify whether or not they are contributing to the problem.

The following tests are examples of protocols that should always succeed. Test both directions always:

Ping by DNS name in both directions (NETBIOS and FQDN). The IP address returned must match.
Access to ‘\\ServerA.contoso.com\admin$’ from the ‘Run’ command in both directions. This must succeed.
From Server B: \\ServerA.contoso.com\admin$
From Server A: \\ServerB.contoso.com\admin$
WinRM basic connectivity in both directions. This must succeed. If it does not, execute ‘winrm qc’ on both servers, accepting all prompts, then test again.
Remote NETBIOS test: winrm id -r:remoteserver
Remote FQDN test: winrm id -r:remoteserver.contoso.com
WinRM successful reply example:

C:\>winrm id -r:ServerA
IdentifyResponse
    ProtocolVersion = http://schemas.dmtf.org/wbem/wsman/1/wsman.xsd
    ProductVendor = Microsoft Corporation
    ProductVersion = OS: 6.1.7600 SP: 0.0 Stack: 2.0

More Information
Recently a firewall appliance sold by a major vendor showed content filtering disabled and not licensed to be turned on, yet was still filtering specific content. This was discovered through examination of network traces. Do not assume content, protocols or traffic are not being blocked. Perform tests to verify.

Written by IT Core

November 23, 2010 at 9:12 PM

Virtual Machine Servicing Tool (VMST) 3.0

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This release of the Virtual Machine Servicing Tool (VMST) 3.0 completely replaces the Offline Virtual Machine Servicing Tool version 2.1.

Version 3.0 of the tool works with System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2, System Center Configuration Manager 2007 SP2, and Windows Server Update Services 3.0 SP2. The tool also supports updating the Windows® 7 and Windows Server® 2008 R2 operating systems.

To Download the Virtual Machine Servicing Tool 3.0 click here.

Some highlights include:
 
•    Offline virtual machines in a SCVMM library.
•    Stopped and saved state virtual machines on a host.
•    Virtual machine templates.
•    Offline virtual hard disks in a SCVMM library by injecting update packages.

Written by IT Core

September 28, 2010 at 12:00 AM

KB2413735: Mouse and screen resolution issues when managing a virtual machine using the Hyper-V

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From KB2413735

Windows Server 2008 or Windows Server 2008 R2, you may experience one of the following symptoms when you connect to a Hyper-V virtual machine using the Hyper-V Manager console or the System Center Virtual Machine Manager Administrator Console:
· The mouse cursor is frozen or has disappeared
· The screen resolution has reverted to the default size
If you connect to the virtual machine using a Remote Desktop Connection (RDP), the symptoms listed above are not exhibited.

This issue can occur after a new Hyper-V VMMS certificate is generated.
Note: The following event will be logged in the Hyper-VMMS event log when a new VMMS certificate is generated:

Log Name: Microsoft-Windows-Hyper-V-VMMS-Admin
Source: Microsoft-Windows-Hyper-V-VMMS
Event ID: 12520
Level: Warning
Description:
Auto-generating a self-signed certificate for server authentication.

To resolve this issue, perform one of the following steps on the Hyper-V server:
·Place the virtual machines in a saved state and then resume the virtual machines.
or
·Restart the virtual machines.

The self-signed certificate that is generated by the Hyper-V Virtual Machine Management service is valid for one year.

To create a self-signed certificate that doesn’t expire for several years, perform the following steps:
1.
Copy the PowerShell script from the following Microsoft Web site:
http://gallery.technet.microsoft.com/ScriptCenter/en-us/be2da634-978b-48d7-b3ab-01c593c9d177 (http://gallery.technet.microsoft.com/ScriptCenter/en-us/be2da634-978b-48d7-b3ab-01c593c9d177)
2. Paste the script into notepad, and then save the file as Cert.ps1. 
3. Copy Makecert.exe to the same directory as the Cert.ps1 file.
For more information on how to obtain Makecert.exe, please visit the following Microsoft web site: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa386968(VS.85).aspx (http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa386968(VS.85).aspx)
4. Open an elevated Windows PowerShell command prompt. 
5. Run the Cert.ps1 script.

🙂

Written by IT Core

September 23, 2010 at 12:14 PM

Hyper-V R2 Cluster CSV stops working when NTLM is disabled in cluster with Hyper-V Enabled

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Hyper-V R2 Cluster CSV stops working when NTLM is disabled in cluster with Hyper-V Enabled

ID: 5121
Source: Microsoft-Windows-FailoverClustering
Version: 6.1
Symbolic Name: DCM_VOLUME_NO_DIRECT_IO_DUE_TO_FAILURE
Message: Cluster Shared Volume ‘%1′ (’%2′) is no longer directly accessible from this cluster node

This error may be caused because the NTLM was disabled in your Hyper-Host. Enabling a policy to disable NTLM may break CSV and cause the alert described before.

If the NTLM was disabled using GPO in your Active Directory Domain, identify the GPO with this setting and create an exception to this policy for all clustered Hyper-V computer objects. Alternatively you can create and link another GPO (GPO with “enable NTLM” setting) that applies just to the clustered hosts. 

 🙂

Written by IT Core

September 21, 2010 at 10:07 PM

Hyper-V Host may stop when VM’s Dynamic Memory use all available RAM

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When setting up VMs with dynamic memory remember that your hyper-v host may stop if those VMs consume (or try to) use all existing memory on the host leaving nothing for the parent partition. 

To prevent that Crete the following Registry Key:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\ Virtualization
RED_DWORD value
Name = MemoryReserve
Setting = amount of MB to reserve for the parent partition.
After setting up the desired value you must reboot the host to the setting become active.

Note: if you set this value too low; VMs will be able to use too much memory and cause performance issues for you. Equally – the higher you set this the fewer VMs you can run.
For more information about memory reserve with dynamic memory check the Virtual PC Guy’s Blog

Written by IT Core

September 21, 2010 at 9:52 PM

KB:980054 Recommended hotfixes and updates for Windows Server 2008 R2-based server clusters

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From KB:980054
This article describes the hotfixes and updates that we recommend that you install on each node of a Windows Server 2008 R2-based failover cluster. When you update your Windows Server 2008 R2-based failover cluster, you help reduce downtime. You also help decrease the number of errors, failed print jobs, and other support issues that you experience.

We recommend that you install the following hotfixes if you plan to install the failover clustering feature on Windows Server 2008 R2 Core:
KB978309: IPv6 transition technologies, such as ISATAP, 6to4 and Teredo do not work on a computer that is running Windows Server 2008 R2 Server Core
KB976571: Stability update for Windows Server 2008 R2 Failover Print Clusters

For additional information about Network related issues and Hyper-V check my previous post at:
Hyper-V Fixes for Network Connectivity related issues

🙂

Written by IT Core

September 11, 2010 at 10:59 AM

KB2397711: Recommended hotfixes for System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2

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KB2397711: Recommended hotfixes for System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2.

Recommended updates for the Virtual Machine Manager (VMM) Server and Admin Console
982522 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/982522)   Description of the System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 hotfix rollup package: June 8, 2010
982523 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/982523)   Description of the System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Admin Console hotfix rollup package: June 8, 2010

Windows Server 2008 – Recommended updates for Microsoft Hyper-V Server and for the VMM server
The following list applies only to systems that are running Windows Server 2008 Service Pack 1
954563 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/954563)   Memory corruption may occur with the Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI) service on a computer that is running Windows Server 2008 or Windows Vista Service Pack 1
955805 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/955805)   Certain applications become very slow on a Windows Server 2008-based or Windows Vista SP1-based computer when a certificate with the SIA extension is installed
956774 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/956774)   A Background Intelligent Transfer Service (BITS) client cannot handle files that have paths that contain the volume GUID in Windows Server 2008 or in Windows Vista
958124 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/958124)   A wmiprvse.exe process may leak memory when a WMI notification query is used heavily on a Windows Server 2008-based or Windows Vista-based computer

The following list applies to systems that are running Windows Server 2008 Service Pack 1 or Windows Server 2008 Service Pack 2
968936 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/968936)   A rollup hotfix package for Windows Server 2008 Failover Clustering WMI provider
970520 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/970520)   The Wmiprvse.exe process creates a memory leak on a computer that is running Windows Server 2008 if you remotely monitor this process by using the WMI interface on a computer that is running Windows Server 2003 or Windows XP
971244 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/971244)   Windows Remote Management (WinRM) does not accept HTTP authorization requests that are larger than 16 KB on a computer that is running Windows Server 2008 or Windows Vista
971403 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/971403)   The “Win32_share” WMI class cannot enumerate file shares or create file shares on a node in a Windows Server 2008 failover cluster

To see a list of recommended Hyper-V updates for Windows Server 2008 and for Microsoft Hyper-V Server 2008, visit the following Microsoft TechNet websitehttp://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd430893(WS.10).aspx (http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd430893(WS.10).aspx)

Windows Server 2008 – Recommended updates for Hyper-V Failover Cluster nodes
957311 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/957311)   Recommended hotfixes for Windows Server 2008-based server clusters

Windows Server 2008 R2 – Recommended updates for Microsoft Hyper-V Server and for the VMM server
981314 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/981314)   The “Win32_Service” WMI class leaks memory in Windows Server 2008 R2 and in Windows 7
981845 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/981845)   The Windows Remote Management service stops responding in Windows 7 or in Windows Server 2008 R2

To see a list of recommended Hyper-V updates for Windows Server 2008 R2 and for Microsoft Hyper-V Server 2008 R2, visit the following Microsoft TechNet websitehttp://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff394763(WS.10).aspx (http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff394763(WS.10).aspx)

Windows Server 2008 R2 – Recommended updates for Hyper-V Failover Cluster nodes
974930 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/974930)   An application or service that queries information about a failover cluster by using the WMI provider may experience low performance or a time-out exception
980054 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/980054)   Recommended hotfixes and updates for Windows Server 2008 R2-based server clusters

Recommended updates for Windows Server 2003 systems that have Virtual Server installed
936059 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/936059)   An update is available for the Windows Remote Management feature in Windows Server 2003 and in Windows XP

Recommended updates that should be applied to Windows 2000 systems before a P2V is performed
834010 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/834010)   A deadlock occurs when a program that uses WMI calls the LoadLibrary() or the FreeLibrary() function in Windows 2000
843527 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/843527)   The Win32_SCSIController WMI class cannot obtain SCSI controller information after you install the MS04-011 security update
892294 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/892294)   A WMI event notification query does not detect a user permissions change on Windows 2000 or Windows Server 2003

Written by IT Core

September 8, 2010 at 11:08 PM

KB2397370: A System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 virtual machine migrated between Failover Clusters fails with Error 12711

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From KB2397370

Migration of a virtual machine from one Microsoft Windows 2008 R2 Failover Cluster to another fails. Both Failover Clusters are managed by System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 (SCVMM).

Error (12711)
VMM cannot complete the WMI operation on server Contoso.LOCAL because of error: [MSCluster_ResourceGroup.Name=”2068e895-4930-42be-a4c8-152ab15a28b8″] The cluster group could not be found.
 (The cluster group could not be found (0x1395))
Recommended Action
Resolve the issue and then try the operation again
.

SCVMM 2008 R2 attempts to execute an operation on the source host (of the source cluster) using the resources names and GUIDS of the destination cluster. Migration will always fail right after the BITS migration when the virtual machine is placed in a saved state.

This issue can only be reproduced under these conditions:
VM is created using Hyper-V
VM is made into an HA VM using the Failover Cluster GUI (resource name will be called something like “Virtual Machine <vmname>”)
VM is in a running state
VM is migrated to a different cluster. VMM will chose Quick Storage Migration with network migration in this case

There are two different workarounds for this issue.

1. Perform the migration when the virtual machine is in a saved state or powered down.

2. Use the Failover Cluster Manager User Interface to locate the virtual machine in “Services and Applications”. Right click the top resource group for this virtual machine and change the Resource Name from “Virtual Machine <vmname>” to “SCVMM <vmname>”. Then refresh the virtual machine in SCVMM PowerShell using the “refresh-vm -force ‘<vmname>'” cmdlet. The virtual machine can now be migrated while in a running state.

Written by IT Core

September 2, 2010 at 12:02 PM

Image to Virtual Hard Disk (WIM2VHD) Converter

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You can use WIM2VHD to quickly create a VHD from a WIM file, e.g. the install.wim file in the Vista/Windows7/Server 2008/Server 2008 R2 installation media, and then attach that VHD to a Hyper-V virtual machine.

Mikael Nystrom blogged about WIM2VHD.

Sometimes you need a fast way to create a reference image. You know, suddenly you need to have a VHD file of Windows Server 2008 R2 and a Windows 7 machine, like NOW. It always seem to be NOW or yesterday that things need to be done, wonder why…

Anyway, you need the following:

WAIK (Well, you only need Imagex, but if you have WAIK installed you have that)
WIM2VHD, and that’s just a small download
The OS (You only need the Install.wim, but I’ll guess you already have the DVD somewhere anyway)
WIM2VHD
This tools i really nice actually, but it only supports Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2. The command line to create a VHD file is quite simple:

cscript WIM2VHD.wsf /wim:g:\sources\install.wim /sku:1

That will create a 40gb dynamic VHD file in less than 3 minutes (Yes, I do have a SSD disk), but it also have a bunch of other commands that could be used to make it more fun 🙂

Required parameters:

  /wim: Path to the .wim file
  /sku: Sku number or sku name

Some Optional parameters:

  /vhd: Name and path to the VHD file you would like to have
  /size: Size (default is 40960 mb)
  /disktype: Dynamic, Fixed or FastFixed (FastFixed requires VHDTOOL)
  /unattend: Path and name of an unattended XML file
  /qfe: A comma-seperated list of .MSU files that you would like to have in the image
  /mergefolder: Names of folders that you would like to have in the image

I use it from time to time when a need a fast solution and i don’t have time to do it the “real” way and in this case the real way is using MDT of course.

Nice work 🙂

Written by IT Core

August 26, 2010 at 12:00 AM

Posted in Tools, Virtualization

Tagged with ,

KB2264080: Update rollup package for the Hyper-V role in Windows Server 2008 R2

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This article describes an update rollup package that resolves some issues for the Hyper-V role on a computer that is running Windows Server 2008 R2 and that is dated August 24, 2010.

Issue 1
When a computer has one or more Intel CPUs code-named Nehalem installed, you receive the following Stop error message:

0x00000101 ( parameter1 , 0000000000000000, parameter3 , 000000000000000c) CLOCK_WATCHDOG_TIMEOUT
Note The Nehalem CPU for a server is from the Intel Xeon processor 5500 series and for a client computer is from the Intel Core-i processor series.

Issue 2
Consider the following scenario:
You run a virtual machine (VM) on the computer.
You use a network adapter on the VM to access a network.
You establish many concurrent network connections. Or, there is heavy outgoing network traffic.
In this scenario, the network connection on the VM may be lost. Additionally, the network adapter is disabled.

Note You have to restart the VM to recover from this issue.

Issue 3
When a computer has an Intel Westmere processor, you receive an error message that resembles the following:
STOP: 0x0000001a ( Parameter1 , Parameter2 , Parameter3 , Parameter4 ) MEMORY_MANAGEMENT

Source: KB2264080

Written by IT Core

August 25, 2010 at 12:00 AM

Linux Integration Services v2.1 RTM

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From Virtualization Team Blog

“We are really excited to announce the availability of the Hyper-V Linux Integration Services for Linux Version 2.1. This release marks yet another milestone in providing a comprehensive virtualization platform to our customers. Customers who have a heterogeneous operating system environment desire their virtualization platform to provide support for all operating systems that they have in their datacenters. We have supported Linux as a guest operating system on our virtualization platform from the days of Virtual Server and continue to enhance our support in that regard.”

The following features are included in the 2.1 release:

Driver support for synthetic devices: Linux Integration Services supports the synthetic network controller and the synthetic storage controller that were developed specifically for Hyper-V.
Fastpath Boot Support for Hyper-V: Boot devices take advantage of the block Virtualization Service Client (VSC) to provide enhanced performance.
Timesync: The clock inside the virtual machine will remain synchronized with the clock on the host.
Integrated Shutdown: Virtual machines running Linux can be gracefully shut down from either Hyper-V Manager or System Center Virtual Machine Manager.
Symmetric Multi-Processing (SMP) Support: Supported Linux distributions can use up to 4 virtual processors (VP) per virtual machine.
Heartbeat: Allows the host to detect whether the guest is running and responsive.
Pluggable Time Source: A pluggable clock source module is included to provide a more accurate time source to the guest.

This version of the integration services for Hyper-V supports Novell SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 10 SP3, SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 11, and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.2 / 5.3 / 5.4 / 5.5.
Obtain the Linux IC’s via the Microsoft Download Center.

Written by IT Core

July 30, 2010 at 12:00 AM

Documentation for Dynamic Memory Resources

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From Virtual PC Guy’s Blog, here’s a documentation list for Dynamic Memory included in in the Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1 beta release:

Dynamic Memory Technical Overview whitepaper
This paper talks about what dynamic memory is, what it does and how it does it.  It is a good read for those curious to understand what is happening under the covers.
http://download.microsoft.com/download/E/0/5/E05DF049-8220-4AEE-818B-786ADD9B434E/Implementing_and_Configuring_Dynamic_Memory.docx

Hyper-V Dynamic Memory Evaluation Guide
This article steps you through the process of setting up SP1 and enabling dynamic memory.  It also gives you some good tips on configuration and troubleshooting.
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff817651(WS.10).aspx

Windows Server 2008 R2 Service Pack 1 – TechNet Center
For all things “Windows Server 2008 R2 Service Pack 1” related – the TechNet Center has you covered.
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff817647(WS.10).aspx

Hyper-V: Dynamic Memory Survival Guide
The TechNet Wiki also has a “Dynamic Memory Survival Guide” article with some extra links.
http://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/hyper-v-dynamic-memory-survival-guide.aspx

Thanks Ben 🙂

Written by IT Core

July 15, 2010 at 12:53 AM